Home > Campaign FAQ

Campaign FAQ:


What is a campaign?

A phishing campaign is a combination of an enticing email as well as a landing page which looks like the real deal. The idea is that the email recipient will be tricked into clicking a link in the email which directs them to the landing page. All it takes is a click for a user to become compromised. Once on the landing page the recipient has the ability to submit credentials (thinking it's the real websites). If the recipient submits credentials that's considered even worse than clicking a link since a malicious hacker will have all they need to log into that user's account and wreak havoc.

We don't collect passwords with our campaigns and only track for the submission of data. We don't store any usernames or passwords.


Available Campaigns:

LinkedIn Job Offer

From: Linkedln Alerts<[email protected]>

Title: <# FirstName #> you've received a message from Eric Smith

Description:
The phishing email is comprised of what looks like a LinkedIn message from another user offering a job to the recipient. If the target should click any link in this email it will send them to a clone of the front page of LinkedIn.com



Verify Ownership of Outlook or Exchange Email Address

From: Outlook Administrator<[email protected]>

Title: Security alert - verify ownership of <# Email #>

Description:
The phishing email is comprised of what looks like an Outlook / Exchange email that is alerting the user that their email address may have been compromised. The target needs to click a link in order to "verify ownership" of the account.



American Express charge without being present

From: American Express Transactions<[email protected]>

Title: Card Not Present Transaction Approved

Description:
The phishing email is comprised of what looks like a $349.99 receipt from Best Buy. Since the "card was not present" the user must click a link to confirm or deny the purchase.



Transunion Credit Score Alert

From: Transunion Notifications<[email protected]>

Title: Credit Score Alert for <# FirstName #> <# LastName #>

Description:
The phishing email is comprised of what looks like an alert about adverse credit activity, that the user's credit score has been affected by the late payment of a loan. The user must log in to "verify the score".



Amazon Gift Card - File Download

From: Amazon.com Gift Card<[email protected]>

Title: You received an Amazon.com Gift Card!

Description:
The phishing email is comprised of what looks like an amazon gift card email. The user must download a file in order to complete the transaction and apply it to their amazon account.



Facebook Login Alert

From: Facebook Alerts<[email protected]>

Title: Login alert for Firefox on Linux

Description:
The phishing email is comprised of what looks like an alert coming from Facebook that an unusual login was attempted. The user must review the login to manage the facebook account security.



Ebay Suspicious Activity

From: Ebay Alerts<[email protected]>

Title: [Ebay] - Suspicious account activity

Description:
The phishing email is comprised of what looks like an alert coming from Ebay that some suspicious activity was detected. The user must log in and review the 3 most recent purchases.



Netflix Login Alert

From: Netflix Alerts<[email protected]>

Title: New sign-in to your account

Description:
The phishing email is comprised of what looks like a sign-in alert from Netflix warning the user that someone logged in from Hawaii. The user must click one of the links to log in and change the account password.



Capital One Repeated Charge

From: Capital One Security<[email protected]>

Title: Potential repeated charge on your card

Description:
The phishing email is comprised of what looks like a double charge on a Capital One card by Amazon for $230.12. The user must click the link and sign in to review the charges and take action.



Bank of America Credit Card Bill

From: BoA Billing<[email protected]>

Title: You have a new bill from Bank of America Credit Card

Description:
The phishing email is comprised of what looks like a credit card bill from Bank of America. The fake bill shows that the user owes over $700 and must sign in to their online banking portal.


This list of campaigns will grow over time, be sure to check back here before launching a new campaign.